Molecule Tiny Homes

Molecule Tiny Homes

This is a recently completed home by Molecule Tiny Homes in Santa Cruz, California. It’s 17-feet long and has a few notable features: a staircase to the loft, a bathtub, and a fold up porch. The whole thing is very nicely done, but those items really stand out in the crowd.

Stairs don’t normally work well in a tiny house because the height in the loft is too low by the time you climb to the top of the stairs. They solved this issue by using a shed dormer in the loft. I’m not sure why they chose to use a shed dormer just on one side, but it seems to work nicely making a nice asymmetrical loft space. The multiple windows and skylight in the loft also do a nice job of opening that space up.

The bathtub is tucked into a corner of the bathroom behind the sink. In addition to the window in the bathroom there’s a door that opens toward the back, which would seem to give the feeling that you’re soaking in a tub outside. I imagine this was a feature requested by the buyer.

The porch at the front door is hinged and folds-up when the house is being moved. Molecule Tiny Homes have been pioneering the implementation of fold-up porches on tiny houses. The porch on this house is small and appears to be partially supported by cables. I imagine it could also rest on a solid support for a firmer feel under foot. I really like the idea of adding fold-up porches to tiny houses, it adds a bit of extra outdoor decking without eating up precious indoor square footage.

To see more of their homes visit Molecule Tiny Homes. Photo credit to Molecule Tiny Homes.

Molecule Tiny Homes - Kitchen and Stairs Detail

Molecule Tiny Homes - Bathroom

Molecule Tiny Homes - Bath

Molecule Tiny Homes - Fold Up Porch

Molecule Tiny Homes - Loft Molecule Tiny Homes - View from Kitchen Molecule Tiny Homes with Stairs to Loft

 

11 Comments Molecule Tiny Homes

  1. CZA

    Hi there! I’ve got a few things I’ve been wondering about these tiny houses on trailers. A) Are the glass windows really safe when you have it on the road? This one has nice, big, windows — which I like — but it also places them closer to the ground. Has anyone ever had a problem with rocks thrown from trucks or anything? Or do you use safety glass on these moving homes? B) I’m not a big fan of using so much wood, and I don’t really like the rustic look? Has anybody done any experimentation on combining tiny house with more alternative materials, such as strawbale insulation in the walls and adobe/papercrete plaster and floors? Do you know of any weight comparisons between using wood and using adobe? I’m guessing if paper was used in it, it would be lighter than standard adobe floor. I haven’t seen any posts on the subject so I was wondering. Am hoping to build within a year. Can’t wait! Thanks for your site. Appreciate all the ideas!

    Reply
    1. Michael Janzen

      Since most tiny houses are owner-built there’s no way to tell how many folks are using tempered glass. Glass doors are typically made with temperated glass.

      I’ve not heard of anyone having trouble with glass breakage while on the move – but tiny houses are typically not moved a lot like travel trailers. I have seen cases where vinyl siding has blown off.

      Wood and metal are most common on/in tiny houses. Steel framing is lightest/strongest way to go I’ve seen but SIPs have lots of potential there too. Research Sing Panels for a alternative to SIPs.

      Materials like strawbale, papercrete, or any earthen material like cob, adobe, earthbag would not be a good idea for a trailer-based tiny house for mostly obvious reasons (weight, vibration, etc).

      Reply
      1. CZA

        Thanks for the reply! No, I wasn’t thinking of alternative materials for a tiny house on a trailer, but I am surprised we’re not seeing more use of rammed earth bags and such for tiny homes on the ground. It’s cheap, fire resistant, with high insulative value, etc. I would much prefer that to all the wood used in these tiny houses, which still makes them too expensive for a number of folks. I do want to build a tiny home on a trailer, though, for travel so it would have to be road-worthy. Thanks for your great blog!

        Reply
    2. hd

      I have seen a place built with recycled wool insulation. That works great in damp climates. Also, as far as Windows go, panels can be fitted to the outside of Windows ( hurricane style) for protection on hwy trips.

      Reply
  2. pat Bowling

    Very interested in your houses. Are any currently for sale? If so, how much? I am looking to purchase a house within the next 2 weeks to a month. Thank you in advance for your reply!
    Pat

    Reply
  3. Sarah C.

    I love big open spaces, so i don’t usually go for small houses like this. But this is so adorable that I wish i could buy one right now!

    Reply
  4. Janine

    I am collecting ideas for my own tiny house build. I love your stairs in the 17 foot tiny house. Super idea instead of a ladder which can be difficult to climb for some of us! I plan on using a 8′ x 24′ trailer for my place.

    Reply
  5. Annette

    I second the positive remarks about stairs – a great improvement to the ladder. The other thing that’s wonderful about this tiny house is the tub. — The bath in general appears to be deluxe as these things go – the opening window adds a nice touch. Finally, has anyone tried under-counter refrigeration/freezer drawers as opposed to the regular 1/2 sized fridges?

    Reply
  6. James Ross

    I travel a lot normally changing location once or twice a year.
    Can your house number 4 hold up to this treatment.
    Can it be reinforced to hold up.
    My original idea was to buy a fifth wheel trailer.
    I like your design better.

    Reply

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