Pioneer’s Cabin (16×20)


Pioneer’s Cabin (v.2)

16′x20′
Living Room, Kitchen, Bathroom, Loft Bed
Front & Back Porch
12/12 Roof Pitch
PDF format – 42 pages – $9.95

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These framing plans contain the plans, list of required lumber, and drawings for this  16′ x 20′ structure.

The walls use standard 2×6 framing with 8-foot interior walls on the first level. The 12/12 pitch roof uses standard framing. The porch roof pitch is 3/12. The upper level is a 10-foot deep loft with a low ceiling (ridge at 7 1/2 feet). See some floor plan ideas for a 16′x20′ tiny house.

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Sample Pages & Illustrations

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Free Updates

Today the plans are complete but over time I’ll make improvements and additions as reader suggestions are incorporated. When I do I’ll send out a link to the free update to everyone who has already purchased the ebook in the past. So in many ways purchasing an ebook from me is really more like subscribing to an expanding design resource.

Please Note

Before building any structure be sure to check with your local authorities. In many communities permits are not needed when building tiny buildings like sheds but the rules range widely so it’s best to research your local restrictions before building anything. Also please note that these plans were not prepared by or checked by a licensed engineer and/or architect. Build from these plans at your own risk.

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114 Comments Pioneer’s Cabin (16×20)

  1. Debbie Dickson

    How much will one of these run…I live in Hawaii and rather then build a huge home I’m thinkin small one would be better…

    Reply
    1. Gene Trumbo

      I like the plans and would like to order a set. I don’t use credit cards, so I wonder if I could mail the payment.
      If I were to add to the design, there is a video on YouTube that shows how to make a cabin more hurricane-proof by building a heavy foundation made with cement blocks filled with cement connected by rebar rods to each part of the building–including the roof. And then there are diagonal wooden braces placed at the corners of the walls. This would make the building stronger. Another idea is offer an option of a 16 x 20 cabin with 12 foot walls to make more headroom in the loft similar to your homesteader cabin. This also would make it easier to add one-story room additions to the sides later. And a circular stairway may be more comfortable for older people.

      Reply
  2. Steve Founds

    How would you add a second floor with your “Tiny house”? It seems to me that the cheapest square footage is the second floor (not just a loft)…maybe a loft above the second floor??? Your thoughts?

    Reply
    1. Michael Janzen

      This has a loft over the first floor. The headroom is lower than a normal second story because the walls are just 10-feet tall. You could make them taller but you’ll probably need fire-blocking for walls over 10-feet (check local codes). Another thought… different from the balloon framing in the plans… would be to frame the first floor with 8-foot walls and then add a knee wall to the second floor and a pitched roof on top. That would give you more height and solves some of the weaknesses of balloon framing. These are lots of advantages of balloon framing… but for tall walls/houses current codes support 8-foot walls.

      Another idea would be to add dormers… shed or gable dormers. Shed dormers are much easier to frame for novice builders and would help keep the look of a steep pitch while recapturing the height in the second story lost to the steep pitch.

      Lastly… sometimes going up is a cheap way to get more space. But you have to factor in the extra weight into the foundation etc. In some areas there are looser codes for single story homes with lofts too. So I think I’d stick with a shorter home with a loft and build onto the house on the ground. As we all get older we’ll also appreciate the lowered reliance on stairs and ladders too.

      -Michael

      Reply
          1. Ron

            I think a basement with a Trap Door from kitchen area would be cool and you can make a Large foundation / Basement , scaled doun at the top to fit the tiny house! And people wouldnt even know its there!! So Cool
            Sincerely Ron N.

            Reply
      1. Carl

        I think to get more room out of the loft space, there should be a gambrel roof on this structure this would make it feel just a little larger…

        Reply
    2. Michelle

      Couple things to consider, for a roomier loft you could move to a barn roof style, also to cut down on the number of feet of piping you could move the kitchen sink to back on the wall of the bathroom, change the wood stove into a cookstove and keep it centre of the house more for better heating, *I live in Canada, love the idea of tiny houses just keeping pipes warm and house warm are two major focuses. solar panels back up on the roof and eve’s run into a grey water tank with the shower/bath kitchen sink run off and you could build a green house on one of the porches. I am inspired by your plans for smaller living.

      Reply
      1. Rob Herring

        +1 for a barn style roof to increase the width of upper floor with standing headroom. You could have 2 large bedrooms up there, or 1 bedroom and a spare/work room, with loads of storage space.

        Reply
      2. di

        Rather than a loft, try a daybed or futon couch on the first floor. Lofts tend to hot in the summer. Because heat rises, the downstairs tends to be cold. Lofts are difficult for the elderly.

        Reply
    3. Peter Slade

      In our local area, while being a local service district, rather than town council zoning issue, we have both high winds and a lot of deeper narrower lots due to subdividing old family land vs paying $30,000 for a lot. The national building codes for the Atlantic region allow for 16′ wide to allow for prefab and barn-style cottages. They don’t mandate a maximum size, so I’m thinking of instead of going 20′ long to keep the same height profile to lower wind resistence but go to 26-30′ x 16′ allowing one main floor bedroom and space that permits us to combine our work space with our living space, with a 10-12′ loft at each end – 1 for sleeping, the other for workspace, with a gallery type walkway between them with regular stairs up to access the upper level. This increase in length is also a greatplace to position an EPA rated wood stove, since we heat with wood in winter, but still have some smaller electric heaters wired in during the build since it will be a year-round home. Replacing the posts with a poured kneewall footing will also prevent rodents and help with insulating the downstairs floor for greater comfort (we plan to use 2″ high density R10 styro, so pipes are run within insulated space and set the pump in an insulated well beneath the house as close as possible to the kitchen and washroom for frost-proofing). Btw, in case I didn’t mention it, I LOVE this style and layout design; big ups to the builder that came up with The Pioneer.

      Reply
      1. Shirley Ross

        Can two loft beds be built in this cabin by utiliizing the front portion along with the back portion of the loft? I really want this plan and if I can afford a printer before you start selling the plans through the mail I will download it. Thank you so much.

        Reply
        1. Michael Janzen

          The loft can be easily extended to cover the open area. I’ve uploaded two additional views to give you a better view of the space. The loft floor framing would just need to be extended and a hole cut to allow ladder access.

          http://www.tinyhousedesign.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/Pioneers-Cabin-16×20-loft-view.jpg
          and
          http://www.tinyhousedesign.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/Pioneers-Cabin-16×20-loft-detail.jpg

          I’ll work on the print option today and see if I can find an easy way to offer that. Stay tuned.

          Reply
          1. Patty

            So how do you get to the upper level? I was kinda thinking about having a lift of some kind rather than steps or a ladder…?

            Reply
            1. John Curtis

              I built a cabin, similar to this and I installed a lift, homemade lift, that works like an elevator. We have a handicap family member, that wanted to use the cabin, because it is in the mountains, and he rolls his wheelchair on to the lift and it takes him up to the loft, where he rolls his chair off. Then he slides off his chair, on to the bed. It cost me about $1,500 in materials, to make the lift, with the electric motor being the costly item.

              Reply
        2. Sue

          If printer cost is a problem, you may be able to print at your public library, especially if the plans are on 8 1/2 x 11″ paper. Most libraries offer black and white printing for around 10-25 cents per page. Some even do color. Copy shops and office stores like Staples may also print from files and charge by the page. I hope that helps!

          Reply
          1. Shirley Ross

            Thabk you for this piece of information. That’s a neat idea. However I just started back to work and I’ll have a printer very soon, I want a hobby collecting different plans, but this is the cabin I’m gonna build because I can easily add onto it from the back so my adult children will have more room when they come to visit. I won’t have to pay much labor because I have several friends to help me build it. Thanks for your input.

            Reply
  3. Shirley Ross

    It’s me again! It may not be a good idea to add an extra loft bed, but what about a walkway and closet? You wouldn’t have to close the cieling in all the way for a nice looking closet. Is that a great idea?

    Reply
    1. Michael Janzen

      Definitely a great idea. If you keep the walkway down the center (under the highest part of the pitch) and put the closets on the sides where the headroom is shorter you’ll have the best use of vertical space too.

      Reply
    2. tom

      ikea for wall mount closet.is it just me or are most people trying to get 2300sq ft out of 700sq ft?
      maybe instead of tini houses we could do medium tini,large tini and xl tini.
      or how about taking the exsisting plan and blow it up to different sizes.700sq.ft,1400sq.ft,and the xl 1800sq

      Reply
  4. Shirley Ross

    Every day I check my emails. Won’t someone else comment on this wounderful little cabin/house plan?

    Reply
    1. Carl Glassmeyer

      While this is a great plan for a really small house, there is a book out with full plans for a 2 story 600 sq ft house called The Little House.

      It has many variables in it and complete material list with drawings and pencil sketches. I am not discouraging use of this plan presented here, but if you are looking for more room Little House might be a possible solution.

      Reply
        1. Carl Glassmeyer

          The book was originally written by Leslie Armstrong. She is a architect of much renown. Originally when she wrote it she was just starting out. It was published by Collier books NY in 1979.
          I am a great fan of little houses by anyone and found this one to be really good due to its ability to be modified and expanded. Hope this helps

          Reply
            1. Beach Strings

              I have been a bit surprised at people wanting to “build cheaper” or “get printed plans”. In my opinion these are about as cheap as your going to get. PLUS if you save these plans to a jump drive or disc any local office store will print them up for less than 12 dollars. Chances are if one is complaining about something related to these prices they really can’t afford to build this anyway. Oh and FYI the book spoken of here would cost much more than buying the plans and printing them at your local office supply store. I believe in trying to save a buck but lets not pinch the pennies so tight that they scream. Come on folks. Let’s be realistic. Everything costs something and your not going to get cheaper than this.

              Reply
              1. William Armstrong

                Hey folks go to the website listed. The largest plan is a 20 x 40 and they are of varying sizes and costs. Good website and very interesting for anyone who wants a smaller house for less money.

                Reply
        2. Carl Glassmeyer

          Shirley,\
          I believe I might have an extra copy and some drawings sent to me by the author. If you cnt find it after exhausting all other possible venues, will give you the spare copy. I have long been a fan of houses measuring 20×20. I have some drqwing previously run in the early 70′s in Ladies Home Journal on a house tow story with a trumbalt wall that is easy to build but two story and plenty of room. If yo want I can copy these drawings (the only set I have) and send you those alos. I wold probly have to chrge you 3-4 dollars for the copying and postage. Let me know.
          Carl

          Reply
          1. Shirley Ross

            Yes I’d like that. Thank you. Here’s how to reach me:
            email hidden; JavaScript is required or 936-637-4877

            Reply
            1. Jackie Rogers

              I am very interested to see about getting a copy of what you have also. I am possibly looking at doing something for my kids on my property and can’t afford large homes

              Reply
  5. Carolyn

    Although cabin building is not in the stars in my immediate future, it is on the bucket list! Just purchased and downloaded this and I’m already thinking about how to maximize storage in a tiny house (afraid I’ll always be a bit of a pack rat, but I’m getting better!) Someday this may be the ‘house in the country’ for me, or perhaps just a guest house on my own little plot. Thanks Michael for the additional pics of the extended loft- every square foot helps.

    Reply
    1. di

      To limit items, start with a handheld computer. This may help to exclude an office, laptop, paper, books, CDs, etc. There are always creative alternatives so that you’ll never feel deprived.

      Try saving a few favorite items and giving the rest to responsible family members. They’ll probably really appreciate it.

      Reply
  6. Laird O'Neill

    Mr. janzen,
    I just purchased your plans and they are exactly what I have been looking for! I plan to build 6 of these adjacent to my bottom field greenhouse operations and offer agri=tourism as an option for our customers. I intend to use a composting toilet and a solar heated hot water system for bathing. Additionally the cabin will be lit by a combination of a very few LED 12 volt lights from a marine catalog and a deep cycle marine battery charged with a solar panel and kerosene hurricane lights. In other words…off the grid and very primative…LOL.
    I have one question, how is the loft accessed? I have looked several times and do not see a stair or ladder. Am I missing something? Thanks Laird

    Reply
    1. Michael Janzen

      I haven’t included a way to get into the loft at this time. It wasn’t an oversight but seemed like something folks would want to choose themselves so I left it out. I may add options in the future. Thanks!

      Reply
      1. Peter Slade

        2 possibilities for the stairs vs ladders questions I’d like to offer up; as I said, we’re thinking instead of the single loft as 1 BR to build 28′ and loft over both ends,1 as guest bedroom, the othwer as our studio space – with a center gallery overhead, where max headroom is available… For that setup, either a spiral staricase kit could be used or you could build in storage under L-shaped permanant stairs.

        Reply
  7. Shirley Ross

    I can’t thank you enough for this wonderful plan. I’ll be getting my printer up and running next Thursday and I can’t wait to purchase your plan. As for me, I intend to have an upstairs ballistered isleway leading to the two side closet areas and every year I’ll be adding on until my heart’s content. Thanks-a-Million and God Bless!

    Reply
  8. Laird O'Neill

    Thanks for the super fast reply. How hard would it be to include an option or two for stairs/ladders? I just love your design Michael !!! I know nothing about what you have to do to provide this and I certainly am not complaining about the value we received in this set of plans! You are our hero of the day. I am not putting in the washer area. Could that be used for a stair? Thanks my new friend!

    Reply
    1. Michael Janzen

      Stairs are tough because they take up a lot of space when built to code. Luckily because the loft isn’t a full second story many places will allow a ladder. I may add ladder designs in future versions with the caveat that they may not be legal in every community.

      As far as location and direction, it would be easier to put the top section of the stairs parallel with the loft joists – and an ‘L’ or ‘U’ shape might work best because the upper landing has to be toward the center of the upper level due to height hight.

      The easiest stairs to add would be a small circular stairway.

      Reply
      1. mlaiuppa

        What about a drop down ladder like used for attics? I have one in my hallway to access my attic and it’s pretty easy to get up and down. Takes up very little room and would allow a larger loft area with no space loss downstairs.

        Reply
  9. Shirley Ross

    Michael, I’m plaining on a built-in ladder instead of traditional stairs since I want my cabin to be comfortable yet a little playful.

    Reply
    1. Dennis Mercer

      Yes, this cabin can be placed on stilts, or piers as some people refer. Depending on where you are in the country, you can use 8×8 PT (pressure treated), 8″ round, precast concrete or 10×10 PT. You could also use concrete block piers if you don’t have any wave action or water pressure from flooding. Normally built about 8′ high, to allow for parking, but check flood elevations in you location, it could be higher. Most building codes will let you use the smaller piers no more than 8′ apart – the closer the better. You may not really need an engineer if you check with your local codes, although an engineer’s review is always good. Some states may exempt the tiny cabins from specific parts of the building codes – check! I’ve been designing coastal cottages for many years along the eastern seaboard and each location is different with building codes (and ordinances too). Also check to see if it would be allowed as a primary residence or a secondary detached structure. The Pioneer’s Cabin is a great design, with much room for personal detailing!

      Reply
  10. Shirley Ross

    I really liked your Pioneer cabin alot but I can’t buy the building materials and cut them to fit without a list and cutting schedule. I wouldn’t mind paying extra for this. I’m totally sereiouse about this plan.

    Reply
  11. John Blevins

    Hi
    I just received your cabin plans and like the layout of the kitchen/ bath with utility and washer/dryer space better than any other plans I have seen, and I have seen a bunch of them.
    I would like to see the cabin extended by 4 foot.
    This would make the cabin 24 foot long instead of 20 foot long.
    This would allow for a stairway and give more living area space as well.
    I don’t see why extending the length of the home would change any structural strength.
    Do you agree?
    The other thing I would like to do is replace the rear porch with bed room addition and make larger than the porch, say 8 foot wide.
    Do you offer any such modification service for this plan?
    Thanks, John

    Reply
    1. Michael Janzen

      Hi John,

      Excellent suggestions, and yes I agree the structure could easily be lengthened since it would just lengthen the roof/walls/floor.

      Sorry, I don’t offer any modification services, but will consider adding these in future versions of the plans.

      -Michael

      Reply
  12. Shirley Ross

    God bless you. I’ve got what I was looking for from another compant so you can take my name off your list now. Go with God!

    Reply
    1. Michael Janzen

      Sure… but to be honest I think you could do that with any house. The size of the system is determined by you needs. The only think PV solar power doenst do well is heating and cooling.

      Reply
  13. Alisha

    My husband and I have been on the hunt for some Tiny house plans for a while now and I love this design. However, I’m finding with most Tiny house plans that there is barely any room for a closet for clothing.

    We live in a 4 season climate and my husband wears suits to work = a lot of clothing – and nowhere to store it.

    Reply
    1. di

      Change the utility and laundry area into a walk-in closet.

      Save more space with under-counter kitchen appliances and a single standard-sized kitchen sink.

      Compact Appliance online could offer an under-counter fridge, combination washer/dryer, portable stove top or 24-inch kitchen stove.

      Reply
  14. Jim Cardwell

    Nice cabin, I want a basement though, with 2 bedrooms upstairs (none on the first floor) Do you have any 20 x 20 plans with stairs?

    Reply
      1. Peter Slade

        Since a) I’m building in Atlantic Canada, meaning will need a kneewall and insulation, since we’re building this as a year-round home, not a summer/ seasonal cottage; b) the 16 x 20 is that bit too small for the year-round life of 2 humans w/ 2 large dogs & overnight visitors every other month it seems, we definitely need a 2 BR design loft. c) If there is an email addy I can send to you pics of 2 very interesting stair designs I’ve found that I believe would not only work but be awesome in this house as a 20 x 20, as they incorporate storage. Drop me a note if you’re interested.

        I’m getting my neighbor, a licensed contractor to work up some things that I’d have to consider in order to meet Canada’s national Building Code, even though we live in a rural area that doesn’t have council or draconian restrictions, but things like window size for escape egress have to be factored into the loft, and since we plan to continue using wood as primary heat to keep the electric bill low, he’s got to plan the location and chimney chase since new build plans are shared with the local volunteer fire dept so they have a floorplan to follow “in the event of” calls. WE love the design, are thinking of placing it so the front door is on the slope-roof side with a small porch to shed snow, and place the back door at the end as in the plan, except offset from center, exiting via the kitchen area.
        Thanks for developing this awesome little home… We are looking forward to seeing what it’s 20 x 20 configuration will look like. Our present house is far too large for just us, used to be my g’parent’s home, 140+ y/o on a stackrock foundation, 2 story 28 x 32 with a full length 32 x 9 veranda. Way too much for us to keep up, we figure to re-use 3, perhaps 4 of the Victorian doors and their mouldings in the interior, but would sell the remaining ones as sets, plus the pine window mouldings and cove mouldings, fireplace mantlepieces, etc to help offset the build cost a little.

        We plan to reuse the heavy full inch rough-cut board to build a 10 x 12 shed for tools, bikes, chainsaw, axe, etc. We figure if we could save the clapboard, we’d get the entire shed built with no costs other than nails and our roof covering!! That’d still leave a plentiful amount for a woodshed, and at least 1-2 years dry kindling and scrap ends for a woodstove, in addition to round & split junks from harvesting space for new-growth in the 9 acres of forest we live on. That will allow many of the young 10-15′ trees to get past the canopy of topgrowth in the spruce & fir uphill away from the house site.
        Thanks, Peter

        Reply
  15. Paul Cataldo

    I’m planning on building this cabin in summer 2012. anyone have any advice? Would love to see some pictures of finished cabins if anyone can share!

    Paul

    Reply
  16. Shirley Ross

    I’m going to be moving in six more months and I really hope to have a building supply list for your pioneer cabin by then.

    Reply
  17. Lory

    I have a concern I purchased plans and it doesnt have a framing plan. I think i should purchase yours but, I would like to have the same lay out and additional bedroom on the back. Its a simple a frame house.

    Reply
  18. Connie

    Cute, but need a bedroom downstairs, stairs to hard let alone ladder. How do you get the bed upstairs?

    Reply
  19. Lisa

    I would like to order these plans. Are they ready to submit to the building department or do they need additional information added? Our county requires: dimensions of structure, window locations, dimensions, type. Locations of required fresh air inlets, rescue and escape window in all rooms for sleeping, size, species and grade of lumber, door location and dimensions, etc. I guess I’d like to know what is included with the plans.
    Thanks, Lisa

    Reply
  20. angelika

    Hi, just love this plan. I can’t believe how neat it is. Looking to build in “cold country”Canada in the spring/summer of 2012. Did anybody figure out the cost of the materials yet.
    Thank you

    Reply
      1. Michael Janzen

        I just posted version 2 of these plans. The update includes: (1) a lumber materials list, (2) eave lookout framing improvement, and (3) end-wall sheathing improvement. The price of the plans is unchanged. I’ve also sent updates out to everyone that has previously purchased a set of plans. If you did not receive your download link please email me at email hidden; JavaScript is required. Thanks!

        Reply
  21. Lauren MacArthur

    Dear Mr. Janzen, Please notify me when your plans for the 20X20 home with upstairs living space are ready. I love your design, and believe it will be perfect for my 2 little acres in Maine.

    Reply
  22. Carolyn

    Just downloaded version 2, thank you- it’s lovely! Cabin building is still in the future for me, but I love dreaming about it. Can’t wait for the 20×20- afraid I will have to have that one too!

    Reply
  23. tash robb

    How about making this as a story and a half (2 – 4 ‘ knee wall father than a direct transition to the roof pitch? I think that it might make this a more usable home.

    Reply
  24. TJ

    How do you get to the loft bedroom? I bought the plans and they didn’t mention this. Where are the stairs?

    Reply
  25. Cindy

    I love this plan! When do expect the 20×20 plans will be ready?
    Does anything special have to be done to build it on a basement?

    Reply
  26. JB Frost

    Working up a materials list is not a difficult thing. Based on the other plans from this gentleman, one can make a clear list and drop it off at your local lumber yard. They will give you a package price based on where you live. Prices in Hawaii are going to be higher than in Boise or Atlanta, obviously.
    Regardless, if you can do the labor yourself, you can build one of these very inexpensively.
    The entire concept here is beautiful. Very stark contrast to where we live (Franklin,TN) where Bigger is Best- and Biggest is even Better- and we’re seeing folks build 8000+ sq.ft. for two people.
    Keep up the good work!

    Reply
  27. Shirley Ross

    Thank you so much for sending me the building supply list. My computer crashed and I lost the list. I’ve finally located land and I’m getting ready to build my cabin and need another supply list. I’ll take pictures through the whole process and publish them. Since the cabin is for me and I’m such a kid at heart, I’m gonna paint it in a mixture of pastel colors. See ya!

    Reply
  28. Jon Batlett

    Did you model this up in Google Sketchup? If so would you be willing to release the model? I’ve been playing around with importing 3D models from Google Sketchup into Google Earth and I’d really like to see where this would fit on my property.

    Reply
  29. Sharon

    I’ve been looking at a lot of tiny house designs and 99.9% of them have loft sleeping spaces. I’m disabled so climbing a ladder is out of the question for me. Are there any plans that incorporate a small bedroom so everything can be kept on one level but still tiny? I would love a seperate “living” and sleeping space if possible. Otherwise I’m looking at either a futon, day bed or pull out sofa option and neither of those is appealing to me. Thanks!

    Reply
  30. Maria

    Several thoughts…

    Moisture and humidity contribute to the growth of mold and mildew, in addition to eventually damaging the materials with which the home is built. With a laundry area, kitchen and bathroom in such a small space, one needs to consider the home’s ventilation needs. During inclement weather, one will most likely opt to NOT open a window to exhaust humid air when showering, running the clothes dryer, boiling water, etc.

    If one opts for a clothes dryer, one should consider how much room is necessary for ducting the dryer exhaust. Also consider that flexi-duct and poorly designed “hard piped” dryer exhaust runs clog with lint, and lint is flammable.

    With a heating stove as the primary heat source, one needs to to consider clearance and flammability. Even if one uses materials such as “fire board” and brick behind the stove, if the stove is too near the wall, the heat penetrates to the materials behind the fire board and can scorch (or ignite) the walls of the housing structure.

    For the least amount of air infiltration and exfiltration, which promotes greatest energy efficiency and the ability to maintain an even, comfortable temperature within the home, building envelope penetrations for plumbing and electrical systems should be kept to the interior walls of the structure. Thus, those designs which feature the kitchen sink on an exterior wall, and the plumbed sides of the bathroom fixtures arranged against exterior walls, are less energy efficient than those with kitchen fixtures on one side of an internal “bearing” wall and bathroom fixtures on the other.

    Also consider putting electrical outlets in the floors rather than the exterior walls.

    Just sayin’.

    Reply
    1. mlaiuppa

      I’ve looked at a few of the plans. I think putting a vent fan in the bathroom and moving the washer/dryer to an outside wall from the interior would work. I’d also put a vent over the stove that vented to the outside. I used to have a microwave that had the option of doing exactly that. It had a light and fan combo under it and you could vent it outside through the wall rather than the roof.

      Aren’t there zero clearance stoves that would reduce the fire hazards? Use fire board or stone or tile around them and that increases the safety.

      I’d be careful of electrical outlets in floors. Some codes won’t allow that. Even using ground fault I’d be wary in case of mopping or spills.

      I know it’s most efficient to cluster all of the plumbing and stacks together, personally I need a window over the sink. I just can’t stand at a sink facing a wall.

      Reply
  31. Forest Daniels

    I would like to know the cost in materials to see if the build is in my price range. If I have the money to buy the materials, than i would like to buy the plans, if not than the plans would be useless to me.

    Reply
  32. Kay

    Love the look and the simplicity. We are looking to build get away/week endretirement. That being said, we are both older (50 something). Do you have a plan that does not have the sleeping loft, but has everything on one floor???

    Reply
  33. Dan Clarke

    I want to build a cabin of this size do you think i could build my walls 10 feet useing 2by6 and bring my loft dawn to 7 feet ?

    Reply
  34. dave

    From what I can tell your plans do not use rafter ties. What keeps the walls from spreading and the ridge board sagging?

    Reply
  35. Shirley Gail Ross

    I ordered this plan sometime last year and lost the material list. Can one be emailed to me or do I need to repurchase the plan?

    Reply
    1. Michael Janzen

      Hi Shirley,

      I just resent the 8×28 Coastal Cottage. If you also bought the Pioneer’s Cabin under a different email address email me at email hidden; JavaScript is required and I’ll find that order and resend the plans.

      Thanks!
      Michael

      Reply
  36. Nancy

    For me the cost of materials is important. Knowing what I am looking at, basically, before I purchase a plan to use.
    Is there a way to get this info?

    Reply
  37. Sara Potocean

    Will be ordering these plans in a few days. Will only change the laundry area. But in the bird’s eye view, I see the entrance door to the bathroom. Then you have a arrow at the toilet to get to the back door. Why is there a partition blocking the back door? From the way I am looking at it, it appears that I would have to enter the bathroom and squeeze past the toilet. And from the kitchen or living room part, I do not see a door going in to the laundry area at all. This is the best design for what I need that suits me. So I will have this style for myself. I hope that a material list will be included and I need to know if these plans can go on a trailer or must they be built on the site. I’m on the east coast and moving to the middle of the U.S. Not sure what is best- build and haul it or build on site. Any ideas or input would be greatly appreciated.

    Reply
    1. Michael Janzen

      The plans show it with traditional framing. But you could definitely build a 16×20 house with SIPs. To go this route I’d suggest looking for a local SIP maker/manufacturer, show them a picture/floor plan and ask them if they can make you a SIP house that looks like that.

      SIPs would replace the normal framing – so it’s a different animal all together.

      Reply

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