Prospector’s Cabin (12’x12′)


Prospector’s Cabin v.2
12×12
Loft
Front & Back Porch
8/12 & 12/12 Roof Pitch
PDF format – 47 pages – $9.95

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These framing plans contain the measured drawings for a tiny cabin. The base structure is 12′ by 12′ and two roof pitches are included in the plans.

The walls are 10-feet tall and balloon framed, meaning that they are built in one piece to make construction easier. The gables are framed separately. The roof uses standard framing and plans for both an 8/12 and 12/12 pitch roof are included. The porch roof pitch is 3/12.

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Sample Pages & Illustrations

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Free Updates

Today the plans are complete but over time I’ll make improvements and additions as reader suggestions are incorporated. When I do I’ll send out a link to the free update to everyone who has already purchased the ebook in the past. So in many ways purchasing an ebook from me is really more like subscribing to an expanding design resource.

Please Note

Before building any structure be sure to check with your local authorities. In many communities permits are not needed when building tiny buildings like sheds but the rules range widely so it’s best to research your local restrictions before building anything. Also please note that these plans were not prepared by or checked by a licensed engineer and/or architect. Build from these plans at your own risk.

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61 Comments Prospector’s Cabin (12’x12′)

  1. doug

    Does the 8/12 roof pitch option decrease the height of the gable ends or increase the height of the non-gable ends?

    Reply
    1. Michael Janzen

      The walls are the same for either roof, so the overall height of the 8/12 is shorter than the 12/12. The walls are 10-feet tall. The overhang of the eaves is essentially the same for both designs.

      Does that answer the question?

      Reply
  2. Ellen

    I’m interested in these plans. I tried clicking on buy now but nothing happened. I’ll go to the library and see if their computers will let me connect to order the plans.

    Reply
  3. jwolf

    How difficult would it be to add a continous wrap around porch vice the seperate front & back porch?

    Reply
  4. Chappy

    Looking for a winter cabin for Northern Wisconsin (Spooner), a few questions:
    Any wiring for lights/heater and any bathroom/sink/kitchen stations…Tks Chappy

    Reply
  5. WTS

    Why not have a gambrel roof and come off the first point after the roof’s peak to make your porch roof? Granted, you would need longer boards to span the distance and more lumber or roofing material to cover those boards but you should have more warmth in the winter and be cooler in the winter because of the dead air space. You would also increase your usable room on the second floor with the gambrel roof line opposed to the gabled roof.

    Reply
  6. Lynore Oliveri

    I am looking for something small enough but large enough to use as a tiny rental or guest house on my property. I need to know approximate material costs for california, if possible.
    which design wouold you recomend?

    Reply
  7. Susie Maxin

    I love your plans. I’m going off-grid and have looked through myriads of plans from garden and ranch sheds to pre-fabs. Your ideas reach all of my goals (loft, under 200 sf, options).

    Thank you, Michael. Keep up the great work!

    Reply
    1. John Curtis

      You could, actually build and outdoors boiler and run tubing through the walls, floor and ceiling, for the hot water to circulate. You build a fire in the boiler, build up a good bed of coals and if the air flow is set right, the fire will burn slowly, eliminating several trips to add wood, coal or whatever materials you use for a fire. I made such a system in my workshop and it warms the shop too well, at times and I have to open a door or adjust the water flow. I failed to mention that the tubing runs through vents, with a fan circulating air over the tubes and in to the building. It sure reduces the dangers of fire and gas poisoning! It’s easy to design and build such a system and it’s cheap to operate – just a little electricity to run the fan! Oh, you can add a humidifier, to avoid dry air! Just an experience I thought I would share! Some of you probably thinks it’s crazy; however, it works great!

      Reply
      1. Richard

        We did something simular and we used pex so there was one continous line with no joints. Don’t forget the glycol to prevent freezing.

        Reply
      2. di

        Try a flush-to-the-wall gas heater as well as gas for hot water and a portable kitchen stove top. Gas is a lot less work.

        Reply
  8. John Curtis

    What’s the chances of being able to purchase a materials list, soon – like real soon?

    Thanks,

    John Curtis
    Ocala, FL

    Reply
        1. John Curtis

          Don’t know what I was thinking! I am starting on it this week, so, I will do a take-off myself. I will; however, purchase your materials list, when you put it out, just to have it with the plans. Would you like for me to send you my materials list, once finished, this week. It should be pretty thorough and it may save you some time.

          Reply
          1. Fred Sanford

            Has anyone developed a comprehensive material list? I thought that this would have one as comprehensive as is seemed. Anyone???

            Reply
  9. John Curtis

    On page 19, of the plans, there appears to be an error in the measurements! The distance between the rafters and the overall length of the roof appear to be wrong. Can you email me the correct measurements or let me know if I am just reading it wrong. Also, do you know the angle of the rafters, where they meet the ridge board, that joins the rafters, at the top and the angles for the Bird’s Mouths, at the other end of the rafters?

    Thanks

    Reply
    1. Michael Janzen

      I’ll fix that – thanks for catching it. Not sure what the correct measurement is until I fix it. The rafters are 24 inches on center though… it that helps.

      Reply
      1. John Curtis

        OK! I can figure it out. Thanks! I am going to start on it later this week. I have a few mods planned, to make it work out better, for my needs. I am going with the A-Frame roof and the loft will be changed to a 2nd floor, with and access door. I plan to use the upper level for storage. The lower level will be a kitchen. The building is going next to my pool, so, one of the porches will overlook the pool and the other, 180 degrees, at my pond. I will be able to catch some fish and fry them right there in my new kitchen! I am going to stucco the exterior, to match my house. Cant wait to get started on it. It’s been a while since I built something from the ground, up and I really enjoy it. Now that I’m retired, I can knock it out in less than a week!

        I will send pictures when I am finished!
        Thanks, again!

        John R. Curtis
        Ocala, FL

        Reply
  10. John Curtis

    On page 6, for example, should the 2×4, notched in to the studs to support the loft joists, span the entire wall, instead of just one side, where the loft is? If not, there will be no support for the OSB sheathing, at the seams, where 2 pieces meet? Or, am I missing something? I’m no builder, so, please excuse any ignorant comment or question!

    Thanks, again!

    Reply
      1. John Curtis

        I’m going to go ahead and run a 2 x 4 all the way across, at the joints. I don’t like to use those clips in walls – they work ok on the roof; however, since I am putting stucco on it, I don’t want to risk a weak joint, where the stucco could crack.

        Thanks,

        John R. Curtis
        Ocala, FL

        Reply
    1. Michael Janzen

      These plans are a PDF download for a tiny house, not a child’s playhouse – although I could see someone with a big budget choosing to build one for a teenager etc. The price for the download is $9.95.

      Reply
  11. Steve

    What is included in terms of interior layout options? I know it is a challenge to fit all the necessities in a cabin this size…

    Reply
  12. Martin

    12X12, where do you put pressurized water tank? Also on stilts like that, how do you bring water into the house without the pipes freezing?

    Reply
  13. Matt

    I’d love to put 2 of these together for a 12 x 24 space on a full basement. Then add a tub for a standard bathroom.

    Reply
  14. Linda Nolan

    Do you have have pictures of the insides of these houses once they are completed ? I am trying to decide witch one would be best but I really need to see them completed, I just can’t picture it from the plans. So if you do can you please tell where to view the photo’s . Thank you for your time.

    Reply
  15. Ben Howell

    Any idea what one if these would cost for materials and labor? I need plumbing, electrical, and HVAC

    Reply
    1. Michael Janzen

      It would really depend on what you wanted to do, and how much you did yourself. A frugal do it yourselfer could probably do it for 1k to 1.5k. A pro could cost 10k+ depending on the have system and selection of hardware and appliances.

      Reply
  16. Javier Manrique

    i want to buy the Prospector’s Cabin (12′x12′) by internet. but i didn’t understand something, it is jusf have one design or have many different designs in the 47 pages???

    Reply
  17. Mark

    Do you think my contractor would have a relatively easy time adjusting the plan down to 10′ x 12′ from 12′ x 12′ using your plans?

    Reply
  18. ida pagan

    VERY INTERESTING, WOULD BE ADAPTABLE TO TROPICAL WEATHER, KNOWING MY HUSBAND WILL INCLUDE HOW TO GATHER RAIN WATER TO THE MODEL. PLAN TO ADD AS AN ADDITION WHEN FAMILY VISIT TO STAY ON VACATION.

    Reply
  19. di

    Try a large arched window on the peaked side of the house. To appreciate the view, reposition the bed.

    Reply
  20. di

    Rather than closets, try storing items in pull-out baskets beneath a chair, couch or bed.

    Try pull-out baskets on open kitchen or bathroom shelving as well.

    Baskets hide clutter. They’re portable for quick, easy cleanups. There are many decorative styles.

    Reply
  21. kelly

    Any plans for a tiny bathroom? I have a 12′ x 12′ shed I’d like to convert to a tiny home for myself and rent out the “big” house.

    Reply
  22. Bryrick Shillam

    I noticed that someone asked if you had completed the material list. Have you done that yet to the downloaded version of the plans?

    Reply
  23. kwat

    I am modeling this Prospector’s cabin as an assignment for a beginning CAD class. I missed the part of the assignment that said click on “free plans” . I have used the sample pages thus far but I need more views and/or dimensions for the two sides with the doors and the area, or at least the height, under the porch. Can anyone send me this information? Thanks

    Reply
  24. Andrew Sebastian

    Do you have any plans for a 12×12 single story with the 2 porches? We have an outside kitchen and out house, all we need is a place to put 2 queen size beds with storage underneath the beds. Thank You. Love your plans and want a single story one.
    Andrew

    Reply
  25. Jinho

    Hi Michael,
    I bought the prospector’s cabin to build for my small tiny farm.
    Now I am trying to build it myself. But it’s a little bit hard to understand the plans with the PDF file. Can you also provide a Sketchup file for this plan as you did for 12×24 Homesteader’s Cabin? It will be very helpful to me while building the cabin.
    Thanks a lot!

    Reply
  26. Emily

    I was looking for 8×12, a shed more than a house… but we are putting it on our property for shed/playhouse. I LOVE the porch in front and back because we discussed this (put bikes under in back), playhouse chairs or swing in front. Anyway, bottom line, do you think we will be able to modify the plans fairly easily to take a few feet off? I think 12 x 12 is great as well, I just dont think my HOA would approve it.

    Reply

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