Tiny House Plans

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6pack of plans

The tiny house plans you’ll find here are drawn with do-it-yourselfers in mind. We keep the prices low to help people get a leg-up on their own tiny house dreams. Inside each of the plans you’ll see how tiny houses are framed with step-by-step illustrations.

If you like what you see below consider getting our 6-PACK OF PLANS (PDF Download) for $39.95.

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Little River Lodge (8’x24′)

The Little River Lodge is a 24-foot tiny house design with a tiny bedroom on the lower level and a loft above. It also has a small bathroom, kitchen, utility room, and a recessed front door.

PDF format
34 pages
$9.95
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Caspar Cottage (8’x20′)

The Caspar Cottage is a 20-foot tiny house design inspired by the historic homes on Northern California’s Mendocino coast . It has a small bathroom, kitchen, utility room, two lofts, and a small porch. The roof has a 12/12 pitch with a hip roof on the back for more aerodynamic towing.

PDF format
36 pages
$9.95
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Calpella Cabin (8’x16′)

The Calpella Cabin is a 16-foot tiny house design inspired by the homes on Calpella Street in Mendocino, Californa. It has a small bathroom, tiny kitchen, utility room, and a little bit of storage, and a loft.

PDF format
35 pages
$9.95
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Coastal Cottage (8’x28′)

The Coastal Cottage is a 28-foot tiny house design with a bay window and two lofts. It can be built on a trailer or off.

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38 pages
$9.95
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Pioneer’s Cabin (16’x20′)

Cabin is a simple 16′ x 20′ building with a front and back porch. There’s also a sleeping loft above the kitchen and bathroom.

PDF format
42 pages
$9.95
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Prospector’s Cabin (12’x12′)

The Prospector’s Cabin is a simple 12′ x 12′ house with 10-foot walls. The tall walls provide extra headroom in the loft above the main living space.

PDF format
47 pages
$9.95
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Tiny Solar Saltbox – Simple Do-It-Yourself Tiny House Plans

The Tiny Solar Saltbox is a simple 8′ x 12′ building with a loft. Also included are instructions for building multiple 8′ x 12′ units side-by-side allowing you to extend the home in 8-foot increments.

PDF Format
45 Pages
$9.95
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Tiny Prefab, A Do-It-Yourself Prefab Building System

The Tiny Prefab is a self-fab building system. The plans explain how to build panels that can be built off-site and then transported to the building site for assembly. Also includes a free copy of Prefab Hybrid (see below).

PDF format
90 pages
$19.95
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Prefab Hybrid – An Approach To Partial Panelized Construction

Prefab Hybrid is a DIY building approach. The plans explain how to build panels that can be built off-site and then transported to the building site for assembly. The hybrid part is that standard framing is used for the roof. This plan is also included in Tiny Prefab ebook (see above).

PDF format
26 pages
$9.95
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Free Updates

Today the plans are complete but over time I’ll make improvements and additions as reader suggestions are incorporated. When I do I’ll send out a link to the free update to everyone who has already purchased the ebook in the past. So in many ways purchasing an ebook from me is really more like subscribing to an expanding design resource.

Please Note

Before building any structure be sure to check with your local authorities. In many communities permits are not needed when building tiny buildings like sheds but the rules range widely so it’s best to research your local restrictions before building anything. Also please note that these plans were not prepared by or checked by a licensed engineer and/or architect. Build from these plans at your own risk.

Affiliate program

If you’re interested in selling this ebook on your website you can earn a 40% affiliate commission for each sale. Learn more about the Tiny House Design Affiliate Program.

More Plans

If you’re looking for more tiny & small house plans I highly recommend taking a look at:

83 Comments Tiny House Plans

  1. Pingback: Tiny House Living , Archive » Tiny Prefab – eBook & Plans

  2. Pingback: Tiny House Living , Archive » Issue 26 – October 7, 2009

  3. Susan

    Nice idea. Unfortunately, I need a tiny prefab lot with prefab tax payments to go with these plans. Oh, and a place where the dogs can run.

    Reply
  4. Diana

    I want to build a cool, tiny, off-grid container house from a 20′ highcube container. The interior is approximately 150 square feet. I’ve already drawn up the plans. What I lack is a space to manufacture the prototype – my apartment parking lot won’t allow it, and volunteered back yards are exposed to the elements. Most residential workshops don’t have the area needed, and commercial space that does costs approximately $5000 a month, and the leases are never month to month. I estimate 6 months to build the prototype and work out the kinks. (Things on paper never transfer perfectly to reality.) I have the funds, I just need the space, a PE to bless the plans, and some technical help on welding. Oh, and a support network of tiny home enthusiasts!

    Everything in my off-grid house is green and sustainable. I also designed it to endure harsh conditions; one reason to use steel shipping containers – they are very strong structurally. They even float.

    I paid careful attention to heat gain because I live in a hot climate, and I used a geothermal heat exchange system. A cold climate would be easier to manage because the interior space is small (a big steel box is easier to heat up than cool down), but in my cold weather plans I still used all the design tricks I could to make an energy-efficient, homeostatic eco-system.

    My climate has abundant rainfall, so a cistern provides sufficient water as well as a heat sink. In a drier climate, a well would need to be dug, or water trucked in, which could also be stored in the cistern. I have a greywater reedbed treatment system, and use a composting toilet. The rest of the energy needs come from solar panels, and I use a mechanical battery along with traditional batteries for energy storage.

    As much as possible, the house systems technology is pre-industrial revolution; the less electricity you need, the less solar power and energy storage you need. I’m a big believer in old technology, because those ideas had to be filtered through thousands of years of use, so often they are very workable and efficient.

    Because of their portability and strength, I was hoping someday to manufacture my container houses for disaster housing. The price point is much less than equivalent disaster housing, which are not green and not off-grid. It’s even possible they could be donated outright to disaster victims at much less cost to the taxpayer than the way this issue is handled now. They would have an asset to help get back on their feet, instead of temporary handouts like rent assistances.

    There is a huge demand for small off-grid houses, and hundreds, if not thousands, of jobs could be created here in the USA to manufacture small housing that everyone can easily afford. Using containers for housing mitigates industrial blight. It’s a win-win-win all around.

    All I need is a place to make it happen, and a small support network for technical advice and encouragement.

    Reply
    1. John Nicholson

      Diana,

      I am wonder how close your are to me. Most of the things you state are the same with me. So, I am wondering if you are close enough that we might meet.

      Reply
    2. Jim

      Just build the dang thing outdoors!

      Many houses are exposed to the elements during building, it doesn’t hurt it!

      Reply
    3. sam small

      Diana,

      I am working on a housing scheme with shipping containers at present. there are many examples of their usages around the globe however I have noticed that the saving are not as much as you would think in economic terms because the true cost is what you put in it opposed to the structure. However if you want to discuss engineering with me I am happy to help you. My interest comes from wanting to build a sustainable business park and youth hostel which hurricane/ seismic safe and environmentally sensible.

      Reply
    4. larry schlander

      Diana: You are in luck because as a woman you can get a grant from the Obama administration to rent a warehouse and build your small house. You have to apply for it and that takes time but its worth it as a grant does not have to be paid back. The government is looking for business ideas that will employ workers. Great idea we need thousands of small houses in the USA.

      Reply
      1. Glenda Ransom

        Any idea where I can locate information re grants to build small houses?

        Information would be greatly appreciated.

        Glenda
        North Carolina

        Reply
        1. Michael Janzen

          Hi Glenda.

          I’ve never looked into grants for tiny houses but with all the money the government is making available for green projects (so they say) I imagine there might some money there somewhere for the clever grant writer.

          Great thinking though! I may do some digging.

          -Michael

          Reply
      2. Leesa Stevens

        Hello Mr Schlander:
        I noticed your post to Diana bout a government grant. I am very interested in purchasing land and building small tiny houses on it. Seveal tiny houses to be exact, like a small tiny community. Can you tell me of this grant(Obama Adm) or direct me to it. Please email me as soon as you can. I am very interested in tiny houses.

        Leesa

        Reply
        1. Ann B

          I too have thought about this. A large piece of land with an acre or two for each tiny house. Please let me know if you find any $$ out there. I am in Ga.

          Reply
      3. Ms. Carol Ann Houseworth

        Where do you go to, to apply for a grant? I am very disabled with Pulmonary Fibrosis and have to use oxygen. A very small place would be great if it included a bath tub especially. Does anyone know where to obtain and the price of a trailer to go underneath?

        Reply
        1. LouAnn Gurske

          Tumbleweed Tiny House Company or Four Lights (Jay Schaefer founder of Tumbleweed)) one of them recently came out with a specially designed trailer in 3 lengths. These are specifically built for tiny houses. A quick online search should find them.

          Reply
      4. Terri Lester

        Could you please tell me about this grant. I know in the future, maybe shortly, I will be foreclosed on with my daughter. I have no place to go. I would very kindly like to hear about this. You can also e-mail me at email hidden; JavaScript is required. Thank you so very much. This might help us from being homeless. Terri

        Reply
    5. Tammie

      I love you your idea. I wanted to know if you could give me any ideas. I want something that I can haul around with me. I dont have alot of money, but I really need something small that I can manage.

      Reply
    6. Mike

      You could try one of the “You Store It” places. Some go month to month. They should have at least one 15-20 amp service plug. You could rent 2 small ones, one for storage and one for production, or 1 really big one.

      Reply
    7. Dr Cheryl Dusty

      What a brilliant job producing idea, not counting I’m a huge fan of the tiny house movement! Have you looked for any grant money for this or angel investors? Because it sounds like you actually could use a warehouse space for multiple unit’s being built by multiple employees! We currently live in a “tiny” A frame and utilize only the downstairs of approx 750 s.f. The upstairs has been turned into a rental apartment which pays our mortgage. I offer you a free page on our website if you’re interested to initially publicize your venture. Best of luck!

      Reply
  5. Rich

    OK, here ya go…

    I have a single wide trailer frame that I salvaged from a single wide left for me by the previous owner of my small farm. With that, I hope to cut it down to 20 ft. and build a “Fensel” like little house but it would be 10 ft. wide by 20 ft. At 10 ft wide, I think I can add a wash basin in the bath and a little wider aisle in the Kitchen. I know that by the frame being wider than the 8.5 ft I’d need a permit to move it but the plan is not to move it. I’m planing around $20,000 (less the Solar Power) to do this.
    I have salvaged some appliances and fixtures for use in the little house but some will be bought new.
    I figure it could have solar hot water, solar power (maybe 2 KW), propane stove, propane heat and propane refrigerator.
    The reason for all this is:
    I’ve been working part of my property as an organic farm and have seen some general requests from students at the local University for some land to farm and a place to sleep. I figure I can get some students going in organic farming and make a small amount in rent while they utilize some of the land. Wonder if I’d ever get 20K back?

    Rich

    Reply
    1. Lin

      Rich, I think you have a great idea. If you have a university in the area which apparently has some sort of agriculture/horticulture/botany program I would say you will always find students looking for a place to live that would also allow them an opportunity to pursue their interest in growing plants outside the academic arena. Mucho years ago while attending Texas A&M I owned an old mobile home that sat on a leased space on a private ranch. I loved being out of town, away from noise, with nothing but miles of fields, or trees for my views. Go for it; I think you will recoup your investment adn you may even make a few converts to the small is good concept.

      Reply
  6. LMRuiz

    Diana – I just wanted to wish you luck. Your idea and the implications are brilliant, unfortunately it is hard for so many to understand the value in such thinking. I dream of living in a small community of off grid self sufficient homes, but modernized at the same time. I would like to meet others who feel as I do and maybe start a small commune (but not a cult) of people who want to reduce their enviro. footprint. If you have room outside that you want to be out in you do not need such a large home. I wish there was more people willing to take the plunge. It is scary I guess but think of the possibilities!

    Reply
  7. Pingback: Tiny House Living , Archive » A Classic Dogtrot House

  8. Cathie May

    Wow and wow again. I’m so exhilarated to find a whole lot of like-minded people. My plan is eventually to build a miniscule house in a cosmic place [which I have chosen]. I want it to be transportable so I can retreat elsewhere in the cyclone(hurricane) season. I am wondering if anyone anywhere has considered the whole business of private land owndership and the way it restricts small living. I hope the day will come when self-sufficient structures can be placed on any small piece of leased land.The present system does not favour this. As soon as you erect a structure, it is ‘affixed to the land’ and therefore owned by the landowner. At least this is the case in Australia. The question is how trasnportable must it be to avoid this legal quagmire.

    Reply
    1. Christien

      Cathie,

      You might want to look into Community Land Trusts. Years ago I was involved in a community group, and learned of Land Trusts. Might be a way to go…or a movement to start/re-start.

      Reply
  9. Michael Janzen

    Hi Cathie… the answer to your question really depends on location. The legal quagmire varies in depth in different places. In some places building anything is virtually impossible and in others the sky is the limit because nobody cares what you do. Often the level of difficulty increases with population density but this alone is not a perfect measure.

    So my best general advice is to first look to see what precedents are set in the location you want to live and then try to describe your project in those terms. The reason is that to change other people’s minds and educate them takes time.

    There’s always a right and wrong time to fight city hall. In my humble opinion the right way to fight city hall is to use guerilla tactics and get done what you want without causing a fuss or expending too much energy. As more people take this approach more communities will begin to understand the value of alternative housing.

    Reply
  10. Pingback: Michael Janzen , Archive » Basic Simplicity Theme version 1.4.1

  11. John Nicholson

    Michael,

    I am wondering if the Tiny Prefab house can be made out of SIP and if it can use a shed roof with a floor plan of 8×16 or 8×20 or 8×24

    John

    Reply
    1. Michael Janzen

      I don’t see why you couldn’t build a similar house from SIPs with a shed roof. In fact it would probably be an easy shape to do with SIPs.

      The only trick is finding inexpensive SIPs.

      Reply
    2. Ted Davis

      Hey John:
      You can use SIPs panels to do the whole house. Walls, roof, gable and floor if you need to. Visit us at egbtech.org to see an unfinished house. We can produce any design and ship large orders in containers, trucks or trains.

      Reply
    3. ada robbins

      John, Just found your query and wondered if you’ve heard any response, as I have a builder who is ready to help me build a tiny house on wheels with SIPs. I worry about strenght, but he tells me they are stronger than stick-built structures. How are you doing with your project?
      My project in an 8 X 24.

      ~ Ada

      Reply
    4. kirk boswell

      To answer your question, yes, yes you can construct with SIPS. Don’t recall precise video name exactly, but just viewed a tiny house on YouTube under ‘tiny houses’ that was constructed this way and was 4-season. Check it out & good luck. Kirk

      Reply
  12. Mary

    Hi Michael,

    I am about to embark on building your Tiny Prefab version 2 — actually, version M, ‘cuz it will be my variation on the theme. I need a house that can be taken apart and reassembled, so will includes its finish materials in the panels. I have a couple questions for you, please:

    a) Has anyone before actually built this plan (that you know of)? If so, how did it go?

    b) I’d like to adapt it to 24′ wide. Only element this really changes is roof panels. Any thoughts, advice, cautions? What is the pitch on your version 2? Obviously they will weigh more, but I will be hiring a couple of hefty guys with ladders.

    c) I’d like to put my finish metal roofing directly on the roof panels, with overlap, caulking, and what-all to seal from weather. Any thoughts, advice, cautions?

    d) Instead of a loft, I plan a micro attic, 8’x8′, for storage and small hot water tank (heated via wood stove, gravity feeding to bath tub) — the rest is cathedral ceiling. Outside of supporting the loft itself, any thoughts on what kind of support will be needed for the roof? Ridge beam, of course… more? center posts?

    e) I will be doing double French doors (actually, two of them, for an open Japanese-esque feel in nice weather). Thoughts on adapting your door panels for a double door? (will be in center of either long walls).

    f) I’d really like to do hip ends on the roof, for better storm/wind resistance (also continues that Japanese-esque feel). Any thoughts?

    That’s it for now. And yes, I’ll share my adventure and adaptations with you as I proceed this summer (fingers crossed. knock on wood, unless disaster strikes). For instance, I haven’t even mentioned how I will be including a core section on trailer bed, with all the plumbing and solar electric components.

    Reply
    1. Michael Janzen

      Hi Mary… great news! Here are the answers to your questions:

      a) nobody has told me they have built one yet.

      b) do you mean adapt the 16′ wide to 24′ wide? (so 24′ x 24′)? If so you’ll want to consider increasing the size of the ‘rafters’ in the roof panels. This will add strength and weight. The roof in the plans for a 16×16 is a 8/12 pitch.

      c) metal roofing is tricky because it is easily dented and damaged. I’d imagined the roofing being added later. If you fasten it before lifting the roof panels into place you run the risk of a bad seal at the seams and denting up the metal. I think I’d staple up roofing felt and then screw down the metal. Then when ready to move the building I’d reverse the process and carefully unscrew the metal and rip off the paper. The metal would be reusable but the paper a lost cause. But that’s the cheap part so no big loss.

      d) As long as you keep the post and beam structure holding up the roof you should be fine. But the other thing to remember is that the loft panels lock into the wall panels and provide some added strength to the building. You may want to adjust your wall panels accordingly for the areas without loft or plan to all multiple top plates to make up the difference in height.

      e) I would either make an 8-foot panel with the proper rough opening and just plan on getting some help with moving it… or… build two 4-foot panels that provide that opening and then be sure to add in more top plate for a header. I would not put this opening below the center of the roof since that weight bearing post should ideally have a strait shot all the way down to the foundation. It would look nice to have it in the center but you run the risk of a weak spot in the structure. If you have a super header over that doorway and some double jack studs in the panels you could theoretically be able to transfer the weight down but it still seems a little risky. The other benefit of not having the loft over those wide door openings is that there will be more vertical space for the bigger header you’ll need. So your 8×8 micro attic should probably not go over that wide door.

      f) A hip roof would be tricky… hmmm… I think I’d switch my thinking for the roof and build trusses… or half trusses. I may have to draw you a picture of this idea because its a little wacky, but it would be something you could take apart, unlike a normal roof. Yeah let me draw it and send it to you separately.

      I’m really looking forward to seeing how it works for you. Love to hear more about the integrated trailer too!

      -Michael

      Reply
      1. Mary

        Thanks for tips, Michae1 — I appreciate your time!

        The trailer core idea: I purchased a recycled trailer frame from old 30′ mobile home, will be taking it to my local friendly welder. Plan to cut it down to 16′(not including hitch) with extra cross reinforcement for the weight. Got new (used) tires for it. In retrospect, I haven’t saved much of anything $$ going the salvage route and it’s been a lot of hassle, but oh well — the “green” cache will have to be reward enough.

        So 8’x16′ on wheels as core — no permanent walls or roof, build your panel pre-fab house around it. A little hard to describe, you’d see it in a minute in a drawing. Core positioned in center of one gable-end (8′ on end, 16′ inward). Subdivide core for key utilities and really heavy fixtures that are difficult to make transportable otherwise. End section is recessed 1 foot for an exterior-facing micro shed (1′ x 8′) to house all off grid solar mechanics and batteries (plus a back-up on-demand water heater). House’s electrical system springs from here, permanent wiring carried up the length of core. Now jump to interior: core is divided up sos that sections are part of kitchen/bath/laundry/liv. — core contains all plumbing, in and out, draining to a simple gray-water system outside. (Will be composting poo ala “Humanure” book, so no flush toilet — I have years of practice at this, never fear.) Core carries all heavy, permanent items: cast iron clawfoot bathtub, sinks, cast iron woodstove w/ hearth, antique cookstove. Propane gas line for cook stove. Micro attic with beefy support situated over kitchen part of core, carries small water tank (hooked to woodstove for winter water heating, and outside solar water for summer heating), tank gravity feeds to adjacent bathtub, bath sink, kitchen sink — not much pressure, but that’s ok.

        It’s a tad tricky arranging it so weight is properly balanced on axles, utility systems connect, and what-all — and make it sturdy enough to bounce around unpaved, hairpin country roads when needed. Overall, my portable homestead will not easy to transport, hoping to not do it often. But possible to move hearth and home, given enough time and labor. I don’t own land, but will be leasing it, so this is a way for me to have my cake and keep it too.

        Wish me luck!

        Reply
      2. Mary

        Thanks for tips, Michael — I appreciate your time!

        The trailer core idea: I purchased a recycled trailer frame from old 30′ mobile home, will be taking it to my local friendly welder. Plan to cut it down to 16′(not including hitch) with extra cross reinforcement for the weight. Got new (used) tires for it. In retrospect, I haven’t saved much of anything $$ going the salvage route and it’s been a lot of hassle, but oh well — the “green” cache will have to be reward enough.

        So 8’x16′ on wheels as core — no permanent walls or roof, build your panel pre-fab house around it. A little hard to describe, you’d see it in a minute in a drawing. Core positioned in center of one gable-end (8′ on end, 16′ inward). Subdivide core for key utilities and really heavy fixtures that are difficult to make transportable otherwise. End section is recessed 1 foot for an exterior-facing micro shed (1′ x 8′) to house all off grid solar mechanics and batteries (plus a back-up on-demand water heater). House’s electrical system springs from here, permanent wiring carried up the length of core. Now jump to interior: core is divided up so that sections are part of kitchen/bath/laundry/liv. — core contains all plumbing, in and out, draining to a simple gray-water system outside. (Will be composting poo ala “Humanure” book, so no flush toilet — I have years of practice at this, never fear.) Core carries all heavy, permanent items: cast iron clawfoot bathtub, sinks, cast iron woodstove w/ hearth, antique cookstove. Propane gas line for cook stove. Micro attic with beefy support situated over kitchen part of core, carries small water tank (hooked to woodstove for winter water heating, and outside solar water for summer heating), tank gravity feeds to adjacent bathtub, bath sink, kitchen sink — not much pressure, but that’s ok.

        It’s a tad tricky arranging it so weight is properly balanced on axles, utility systems connect, and what-all — and make it sturdy enough to bounce around unpaved, hairpin country roads when needed. Overall, my portable homestead will not easy to transport, hoping to not do it often. But possible to move hearth and home, given enough time and labor. I don’t own land, but will be leasing it, so this is a way for me to have my cake and keep it too.

        Wish me luck!

        Reply
        1. Michelle

          I would love to hear how this project has gone and/or if it is complete. Sounds extremely interesting.

          Thanks for sharing!
          ~Michelle

          Reply
  13. Pingback: Art of Upcycling: 20 DIY Wood Pallet Reuse Project Ideas : The Green Children Foundation

  14. Pingback: Art of Upcycling: 18 DIY Wood Pallet Reuse Project Ideas | WebEcoist

  15. Ashwin

    I am looking to buy plans to build individual tropical beach cabana, chalet, cabin or hut plans that includes all amenities. any help?

    Reply
  16. Debbie

    I am so interested in Tiny Houses and would like to build one soon, I have the space…I was just wondering if there was anyone in Michigan who has built or is building one?

    Reply
  17. AnnieinKC

    I work with the homeless in Kansas City, most of whom sleep down at the river under the bridges. These container homes would be a fabulous shelter, and especially if they had solar. Anyone interested in helping me finance this project or donating to it may email me at email hidden; JavaScript is required. Advice is very welcome, as well!

    Reply
  18. Gene Trumbo

    Hi,
    I saw your 12×24 2-story house design on YouTube. The note said the plans would be for sale for $9.95 when they were ready. I didn’t see it on your website. Do you have these plans for sale now?
    What is the ordering information?
    Thanks

    Reply
  19. Gene Trumbo

    I found the 12×24 tiny house on your website. It reminds me of the small homes in the flooded 9th ward of New Orleans. Also, people who used to live in the country and needed a little house in town to stay while they shopped and went to church were also 2-story and 12×24. Some names I can think of are “Refuge”, “Independence”, “Heart’s Desire”, “Enough”, “Pride & Joy”, “Home Base”, “Carefree”, and “Thoreau’s Mansion”.

    Reply
  20. john chamberlain

    Hi Michael,
    why leave out the services in your book when the green revolution needs to know of how to save water,electricity and labour…….. do it as an annex (3rd.Edition). It improves the usefullness……………also why is the roof pitched two ways when it would be easier to single pitch it and create an overhang and shading.

    I’m thinking about doing a book on the houses designed for holiday people………….small scale but compact and panel based….but with an ecological service core. UK maunufacturers are inhterested and it could also be DIY……… but without services its a no-no.
    John

    Reply
  21. Carol

    My husband passed away almost 4 yrs ago and I found out 3300 sq foot house a monster to care for and heat. Without the second income OMG I was in a panic as it cost $600 a month in propane in the harsh Michigan winters and a $150 plus a month electric bill to run the furnace/lights. Sooooo a friend had a travel trailer 1974 24′ that I traded for some old motorcycle parts and here I am my 3rd year in this camper on my property. Next to my bonfire pit, horse paddocks and away from that “slave to keep dusted huge house” This camper without any extra insulation only costs me about $120 a month to heat in the winter and aprox $50 in the summer to cool. Ive found my nitch in life and I couldnt be happier.

    Now to find my now homeless brother in law (closed head injury left him without work) a suitable camper to live in as well that is affordable to heat and cool. OR a tiny house as these to build out of reclaimed wood/materials. Any suggestions or help in the Thumb area of Michigan??

    Carol

    Reply
  22. Carol

    Michael,

    Thank you so much for the link, but too funny…I stumbled onto it just after I posted that comment. And come to find out Jonathan lives just about 15 miles north of me. I just posted to him as he’s needing some pallets and I know where a pile is for free. So maybe I can pick his brain some and get something up for my brother in law soon enough? Might have to borrow a camper for the winter as the weather here is starting to get nasty. Until we can start a tiny house, come spring

    Thanks for you time Michael. Happy Trails

    Carol

    Reply
  23. Lynn

    I wanted to share this because we are so excited about our upcoming move. My husband and I and our 3 children are moving from a 3000sqft house to a 1300sqft cabin in the mountains. We found the cabin and knew it was for us. It is a cabin shell, so the outside is complete, and we will begin the interior finishing in Feb after we close. I have been a Tiny House fan for a while but couldn’t figure out how to do it with a family of 5. But when we found the cabin we knew this was it. We are working on designing a floorplan that will work for our family. Because the cabin shell is complete, we have to work with the layout (meaning the door and windows that are already there). I am excited for what this will do for my family. We want to simplify, and live within our means, we’ve been stretched thin for so long. If anyone can help me with a floorplan for a 28X48 cabin (3bed, 2 bath) I could really use the input.

    Reply
    1. Ric U.

      Nadia and everyone else,

      If you are in the NYC area and need a lot for your little house, I am in a “community” in northeastern PA which caters to this sort of tiny house. It comes with water, electric and sewer already in place and included in a tax, H.O.A. utilities package of under $2,200 complete annually,

      Ric U.
      email hidden; JavaScript is required

      Reply
  24. Otessa Regina Compton

    I am surprised that with the ever increasing homeless population we have in our USA, that no company of magnitude has decided to make a number of these homes, for people getting a chance to start over. Homes like these can be designed for single people, single mothers and father, and “whole” homeless familes who sincerely want to work and start over. Why, Why, Why do we have shelters in most cases leading to no where. So many things can be accomplished with homes like these to help people get back on there feet, and have time located in various areas of every city. This is a project we as USA Citizens could take great pride in, knowing homes like these, could help people help themselves, and it would be a piece of property they could call their own home.

    Reply
    1. Terri

      I so agrre we have mobil home parks why not tiny home parks. I would love to live in one. I am single starting over after a divorce. Dont want anything big. Dont want to tske care of anything big. These are perfect for people whovare starting over

      Reply
  25. Tammy

    i have been living in a 12×16 motel room for almost 3 years now.. i have converted that space into a total living area with kitchen, bedroom, livingroom, foyer, and bathroom.. it is time to get codes changed so i can own my own 12×16 and live in it legal instead of renting a 12×16 motel room..i have pics and prints and can tell you small living can be done…started out as a necessity but now i love the small living..

    Reply
  26. Ric U.

    For the past 3 months, I have been asking for information about a tiny house which would be about 400 square feet (40 feet long by 10 feet wide), with no deck or porch. The interior designs of the units I have seen are great but the size is too small. Who can help me get his information?

    Ric U.

    Reply
    1. Michael Janzen

      Rick this is the first comment you’ve posted on my blog from you. If you’ve been asking it must have been eleswhere. I’ve not drawn anything 10×40. I have done 8×32 and 12×32 which are in my book. bit.ly/tinyhousefloorplans THat might give you some ideas of what can be done.

      Reply
  27. Paul

    Nice designs BUT one problem I am getting to the points were a Loft is not practical. I really need something that is all on one level.

    Reply
  28. Ric U.

    To everyone in the NYC-Albany, NY-Allentown, A areas,

    If you are looking for a site for your Tiny House, I am in northeastern PA in a “community’ where sites are going for less than $15,000 with annual H.O.A.., taxes, electric, water, sewer and “community” activities which total LESS than $2,200.

    The bus from NYC (Port Authority Bus Terminal) stops about 4 miles down down the road wth FREE parking.

    Ric U.
    email hidden; JavaScript is required.

    Reply
  29. katie blue

    I live in a 16’x36′ cottage. I am a retired 67 year old lady. My 18 year old granson built it for me on old unused swamp property. Money was very tight. I now have a wonderful home. All that I need and surrounded by trees and wildlife. No neighbors to complain about my dogs No house payments what a way to retire . Grandson thanks me for believing he could do it.

    Reply
  30. Yippee K

    Have built and lived in numerous “tiny houses” on three different continents including some made from shipping containers. Not a fan of containers as they are heavy and don’t “breathe”. Plus I’m a woodworker and therefore partial to wood. Wood allows a lot more creativity in layout & interior finishes imho. Private land ownership is actually a boon to tiny living. There are tons of private landowners who would welcome a tiny house somewhere on their land. But just try parking your tiny house on any kind of publicly-owned land for any length of time. Also if I was living in a tiny house that Ohbummer financed I think I would eventually shoot myself. Taking a government grant (someone else’s tax money) to go off the grid is like pissing in your drinking water reservoir. If you geniuses want to really do some good in the world, go build tiny houses in South Africa. The townships are communities of millions of people living in very primitive makeshift tiny houses. Providing living with conveniences in the same dimensions would be a huge boon. I know because I’ve done it. You could spend the rest of your life doing just that and not a minute would be wasted. You have no idea the gratitude and love and appreciation you get over there for doing that. Ohbummer’s own uncle could use a tiny house in his township in Kenya for that matter. Not too surprised “The One” has never thought of that, freakin lyin hypocrite that he is. How much of that green money he’s dumpin down the union drains would it take to house everyone in his uncle’s township? Not much I bet.

    Reply
  31. Albertha

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  32. Zendelle

    Michael,
    I love your prefab idea – we have land with an existing foundation on which to build. Prefab is more practical because the place is remote and far enough away that we can’t get there very often. If we planned to build on site, we would have to leave materials there which would likely get stolen. Better if we can build the panels ahead and do the construction all at once.
    Our existing foundation is a 16 x 36 full foundation plus a 12 x 20 slab. We plan to build a tiny house on the slab for my Mom and a small house on the full foundation for hubby and me. I am the youngest at 50 years old so we are not interested in any lofts. We need to put a shed roof on the tiny part because it abuts the small part (and may go with a shed roof on the small part too). Does your prefab book or your hybrid book address shed roofs at all? If not, will they work with a shed roof, and where might I get the plans for that part? Thank you for all you do!

    Reply
    1. Michael Janzen

      Yes (shed roofs) but with shorter spans. You know what you might consider is doing a hybrid or panels and a traditionally built roof. Although with an existing foundation you might want to consider building the whole thing with traditional stick framing. The reason is that you’d be better positioned to adapt to the existing measurements. Just a thought.

      Reply
  33. Pingback: Is A Tiny Cabin In The Works? » TinHatRanch

  34. Rhiedyk

    Been very interested if there are any grants possible to get my own piece of property and some assistance on some shelter while I handle the rest in small careful steps.
    I am currently renting a shit hole rental with the management not living up to said title.
    any one that is in the know don’t be shy to say something I am looking for this idea to come through due to the fact I am on disability and with a rigged income I grow ever so tired of this place and the people around me.
    It just is not natural for human beings to live this way.

    Reply

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